Tag Archives: backdrops

How to create a backdrop wall in your studio

How to create your own backdrop wall in your ‘studio’

My studio is in estate agents terms: ‘bijou and compact’, the quality of the images I produce means this is irrelevant as I am sure most photographers will agree – size doesn’t matter!

However, I wanted to have the ability to use my wonderful range of backdrops (from Photographers Floors and Backdrops in the UK) without having to take up vital space with stands and poles etc…

I wanted something that would be absolutely solid when hung and that there was no chance of it falling off the wall and landing on to a client.  It had to be straight which is why I used a baton to secure the hooks to the wall, as I only then had to make sure the hooks lined up on the already straight baton.

So here’s how I transformed my walls!

 

You will need: 

  • Backdrop(s) of the SAME height
  • Sharp scissors
  • Eyelet rings (the ones you use for curtains – standard size or bigger)
  • Thin wooden baton slightly wider than the width of your backdrop and thick enough to hold hooks.
  • 5 hooks that screw into the above baton – bear in mind that they may be at eye height so something safe not sharp.
  • Drill, raw plugs, wall screws and spirit level and relevant safety equipment.
  • Floor space big enough to lay out your backdrops flat.
  • A helpful person!

 

step-1-backdrop-tina-bolton-photography-4sqStep 1

Measure the spaces where you want the rings to be.  In my 5ft width backdrop I used 5 rings.  Using the rings as a template.  Make sure each ring is the same distance from the top to ensure they all hang at the same height on the backdrop.

 

 

 

 

step-2-backdrop-tina-bolton-photography-5sqStep 2

Cut out the holes for the eyelets – cut the holes slightly bigger than the circle you drew.

 

 

 

 

step-3-backdrop-tina-bolton-photography-3sqStep 3

Separate the eyelet rings (use closed scissors to unclip them) and push the ring with the spikes through the hole to ensure a good grip and click the other half on.  Eyelets are usually designed for quite thick fabrics and they went through the vinyl quite easily.

Repeat steps 1-3 until you are happy that you have enough eyelet rings to provide safe hooks.

 

 

 

step-5-backdrop-tina-bolton-photography-6sqStep 4

Prepare your baton to the correct length (paint it the matching colour you want and leave to dry) then mark out where it’s going to go using a spirit level to ensure it is perfectly straight.  Mark out your holes, drill, apply raw plugs.

Before you fix your baton to the wall, place it on the floor and place your first prepared backdrop over it and line up the edges and where your hooks will go in relation to the eyelet holes – mark them up.

Now fix the baton to the wall. (I used three screws – one either end plus a central one.)

 

step-4-backdrop-tina-bolton-photography-10sqStep 5

Attach your hooks to the baton

 

 

 

 

 

step-8-backdrop-tina-bolton-photography-8sq

Step 6

Hang your backdrops!  With the single door hooks I can hang three backdrops.

 

 

 

 

Points to note:

Since hanging the backdrops I would advise the following:  create a baton with three extra hooks spaced apart as before – then this will make it easier to swap your backdrops around.

The eyelet rings means they will not roll up as neatly for the tubes as before but you can either tie them once rolled, or simply unclip the eyelet rings temporarily.  I use the bottom of the backdrop with velcro to attach to a backdrop and pole system when needed at a mobile event.

How to create your own backdrop wall with pics Downloadable PDF

I hope this helps – get in touch and let me know or if you have any questions!  tina@tinabolton.co.uk

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